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Nineveh. Capital of a World Empire at Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

Nineveh, 2,700 years ago was the capital of the mighty Assyrian empire and the largest city of the world. The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden brings together 250 of Nineveh's top pieces from international museums, for the first time since their discovery over 180 years ago. The Prince Claus Fund financially supports this exhibition and its Cultural Emergency Response programme will be featured in its threats to heritage-section.

Nineveh, the residence of the Assyrian kings, was famous for its impressive palaces, worldly temples, and colossal golden statues. The exhibition 'Nineveh' is an introduction to the city, its history, its inhabitants, and the many gods they worshiped.

Over 250 items and art pieces from home and abroad are gathered in the Leiden exhibition. Among the items there are dozens of reliefs from Nineveh's palaces, jewellery, a golden death mask, as well as clay tablets from the Assurbanipal library - the world's oldest library, statues of gods and winged creatures, glazed earthenware and rare ivory inlay. A special part of the exhibition includes the major reliefs from the city palaces and the 3D reconstruction of a hall from the palace of King Sennacherib.

The story of the exhibition covers nine thousand years: from the first occupation to Islamic culture and 19thcentury archaeological excavations, up till the recent situation in Mosul and how dangers like IS and encroaching urbanisation threaten the ruins of this once great city. Original excavation films, photographs and prints of the 19th and 20th centuries illustrate the stories of the archaeologists who worked in Nineveh - including greed, mischief and espionage. Special attention is paid to heritage in crisis areas and ways to preserve the past for the future.

The exhibition Nineveh. Capital of a World Empire can be seen from 20 October 2017 to 25 March 2018 at the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden, Leiden.

The Prince Claus Fund and the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden will also organise activities around this exhibition: more news about this will follow soon.

For more information on the Nineveh exhibition please visit: www.rmo.nl/nineveh

Photo: Two women are taken away by an Assyrian warrior. Relief from Nineveh, 668-626 BC. Courtesy of Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

Nineveh. Capital of a World Empire at Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

"Nineveh. Capital of a World Empire"

Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

Nineveh. Capital of a World Empire at Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

Nineveh, 2,700 years ago was the capital of the mighty Assyrian empire and the largest city of the world. The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden brings together 250 of Nineveh's top pieces from international museums, for the first time since their discovery over 180 years ago. The Prince Claus Fund financially supports this exhibition and its Cultural Emergency Response programme will be featured in its threats...

 
 
 
 

Nineveh. Capital of a World Empire at Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

Nineveh, 2,700 years ago was the capital of the mighty Assyrian empire and the largest city of the world. The Rijksmuseum van Oudheden brings together 250 of Nineveh's top pieces from international museums, for the first time since their discovery over 180 years ago. The Prince Claus Fund financially supports this exhibition and its Cultural Emergency Response programme will be featured in its threats...